Interview: Milo Manly, September 11, 1984

Title

Interview: Milo Manly, September 11, 1984

Subject

African Americans--Civil rights
Race discrimination.
United States--Race relations.
African Americans--Housing.
African Americans--Employment.
African American leadership
African Americans--Southern States.
African Americans--Politics and government.
African Americans--Social conditions.
African Americans--Societies, etc.
Philadelphia (Pa.)--Social conditions.
African Americans--Legal status, laws, etc.
African American neighborhoods

Description

In this 1984 interview, Milo Manly (1903-1991) discusses his experiences in Philadelphia during the 1920s and 1930s with the Lloyd Committee, Mothers Assistance Fund, and the Philadelphia branch of N.A.A.C.P. He also talks at length about his father, Alexander L. Manly (1866-1944), who fled in 1898 from a lynch mob in Wilmington, North Carolina to Washington D.C. and then to Philadelphia in 1902. There, as secretary of the Armstrong Association, he played a significant role in providing job opportunities for Black migrants to the city during the era of the First Great Migration.

Date

1984-09-11

Format

audio

Identifier

2014OH174GN026

Interviewer

Charles Hardy

Interviewee

Milo Manly

Interview Keyword

Armstrong Association
Race riots--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.
Depressions--1929
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Files

manly.jpg


Citation

“Interview: Milo Manly, September 11, 1984,” Goin' North, accessed October 22, 2019, http://goinnorth.org/items/show/1060.